Baby born without blood

HAPPY: Amalia Burne, now six months old, plays with her sisters Nevaeh and Ariana Wilson. Picture: Marina Neil WHEN Rebecca York first laid eyes on her newborn daughter, she was barely breathing and was ‘‘pale white’’.
杭州楼凤

For a moment supposed to be filled with joy, Amalia’s birth turned into a nightmare for Ms York and Amalia’s father, Robert Burne.

Doctors rushed to put an oxygen mask over the baby’s head and soon asked Ms York to sign documents allowing them to perform an emergency blood transfusion.

Amalia had lost 93millilitres of blood during her birth, usually babies that lose up to 30millilitres don’t make it out of hospital.

‘‘I went into labour three weeks early but I didn’t know there was a problem,’’ Ms York said.

‘‘Having already had two babies, I just thought everything would be fine.’’

For the next few hours after Amalia’s birth, Ms York was separated from her baby girl and had no idea what had happened.

All she could think about was whether she would get to hold her again.

‘‘She was pale white, it was like nothing you’ve ever seen in your life,’’ Ms York said.

‘‘There was no colour to her at all.

‘‘We were just shocked, it’s supposed to be the happiest time of your life.

‘‘It turns your whole world upside down.’’

Amalia is now six months old and has just come through her latest check-up.

Her condition is fine and she is just as healthy as any other baby her age.

Yet Ms York said she still had no explanation for what happened to Amalia and there is still no indication of whether there will be problems as her brain develops.

All they know is she suffered a feto-maternal haemorrhage, a very rare illness.

‘‘We don’t really know anything about the condition,’’ Ms York said.

‘‘She’ll go in for another check-up when she’s 12months.

‘‘We won’t know anything more until she starts learning. There may be some brain damage because of the lack of oxygen.’’

For now, it’s happy days for Amalia and her two sisters, Nevaeh and Ariana Wilson.

‘‘We feel very blessed to have her and she wouldn’t be here without the doctors at [John Hunter Hospital],’’ Ms York said.

‘‘She’s our miracle baby.’’

Ms York has set up a Facebook page called Fetomaternal Hemorrhage Support Group to connect with other parents whose baby has suffered a similar condition.

‘‘It can be really hard because there’s nothing out there, no support groups and they can’t even tell you why it’s happened,’’ she said.

HAPPY: Amalia Burne, now six months old, plays with her sisters Nevaeh and Ariana Wilson. Picture: Marina Neil

NIGHTMARE: Amalia lost 93millilitres of blood during her birth.

NIGHTMARE: Amalia lost 93millilitres of blood during her birth.

HAPPY: Amalia Burne, now six months old, plays with her sisters Nevaeh and Ariana Wilson. Picture: Marina Neil

HAPPY: Amalia Burne, now six months old, plays with her sisters Nevaeh and Ariana Wilson. Picture: Marina Neil

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